Soup Kitchens

When people think about Preble Street, they often think of a soup kitchen.  Of a line of people winding around the corner at the Resource Center, patiently waiting to be served a hot and nutritious meal.

Each and every day more than 1,100 meals are served to homeless and low-income adults, children, and families at eight Preble Street Soup Kitchens, which operate at the Resource Center, the Teen Center, and at Florence House.  Unfortunately, it’s a number that has increased drastically in recent years.

There is no easy way to eliminate hunger in the world or in our neighborhood.  None of us alone can do it. But we are all part of the solution.

We now serve 500,000 meals a year, with the help of 5,000 volunteers a year—from the faith community, area businesses, schools, civic groups, and individuals—and the generous support of local food drives and donated food.

photo_soupkitchen_calloutFood and More

At the Resource Center we serve three meals a day, every day of the year to people of all ages—ranging from homeless youth to elders and immigrant families struggling to maintain independence on a fixed income—for whom food is scarce.  We provide dozens of bag lunches for homeless working people who can’t return to the Soup Kitchen mid day and can’t afford to buy lunch.

At the Teen Center and at Florence House, we serve lunch and dinner to homeless teens and women as well as providing breakfast food and nutritious snacks at Florence House and the Joe Kreisler Teen Shelter.

While the purpose of the Soup Kitchens is to provide a nutritious meal, they are also an important entry point to services for individuals and families who are homeless or living in poverty.

All the soup kitchens are co-located with Preble Street programs, and caseworkers and outreach workers from collaborating organizations throughout the community can meet and engage with people in need of services.  They are also within easy proximity of most community resources, facilitating access to a range of services from employment to housing to health care that may help them escape the cycle of hunger and homelessness.